Satya Giordano, CECT

Michael R Neuert, MA, BSME

Neuert Electromagnetic Services

Electrical Contractor License #687093

Measuring 5G Signals (Update)

By Michael R Neuert, ©2020 EMFCenter.com

We are now in the early stages of the implementation of 5G.  We know that 5G will utilize some additional frequencies that are above 8 GHz, but we do not yet know exactly what all those frequencies will be, or to what extent they will actually be used.  It is likely that the main backbone for most modern wireless digital signals will continue to be in the frequency range below 8 GHz, and these will continue to be picked up by the Safe & Sound Pro II, the Acoustimeter AM-11, the Acousticom-2, and the Safe and Sound Classic (to name some of the RF meters we currently recommend).  But with 5G, it is very likely that there will also be some RF fields with new frequencies above 8 GHz that will be “added in” to the mix – frequencies that the current RF meters will not be able to detect.

Presently, there is no consumer priced RF test meter available to adequately pick up any of the potential new frequencies above 8 GHz.  In the past, it has taken the test meter manufacturers a year or more to respond to changes in technology with appropriate RF test meters.  I suspect that this time, for 5G, due to the increased popularity and sales of RF test meters, that the test meter companies will respond much more quickly, but that remains to be seen.  If cost is an issue, I would recommend getting an Acousticom-2 for now, because it may still be some time before the new meters come out that are appropriate for the higher frequencies of 5G, although of course I do not know the exact time frame.

And because it is already very difficult for manufacturers to design meters to accurately test such a wide frequency range as 200 MHz to 8 GHz, it is likely that the future coming 5G meters that are designed for the higher RF frequencies may be specialized for detecting only the higher 5G frequencies, and thus will be used in combination with the current meters – as supplemental meters rather than replacements.   But this is not known yet.  Perhaps the most important thing to keep in mind at this time, is that the existing 200 MHz to 8 GHz RF test meters that are available now will continue to be very important and helpful for detecting the vast majority of the actual 5G that is already here, and yet to come.

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